Will the Iranian Regime Close the Strait of Hormuz?

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Dr. Reza Parchizadeh to the Egyptian Masrawy:

The Strait of Hormuz is a rather narrow waterway at 39 kilometers wide. As such, the Iranian regime can try to close it by setting sea mines across the strait as well as using armed IRGC speedboats and navy warships to patrol the waters along the strait. However, in my opinion, the more important questions are, if the Iranian regime did close the strait, would it be able to keep it closed for an extended period of time? And, would it be able to bear the consequences of this act? The United States keeps issuing strong warnings to the effect that if the Iranian regime closed the strait, it must be ready to face the consequences. That can mean military action to reopen the strait, if not necessarily invading the regime on the Iranian soil proper.

The Persian Gulf is a closed body of water whose basin contains one of the greatest concentrations of oil and gas around the world. There is no marine way out of the gulf but the Strait of Hormuz. That is why in recent years some of the Arab nations in southern Persian Gulf have been considering setting up a large pipeline that carries the oil from the gulf’s basin to either the Arabian Sea or the Red Sea. However, so far that project has not become operational as far as I know. In any case, if the Iranian regime tried to close the strait, I don’t think the US and her allies in the Middle East would want to take a passive stance. That means the strait would be reopened one way or the other.

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Reza Parchizadeh

Reza Parchizadeh is a political theorist and analyst. His area of expertise is the Middle East, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Russia. Reza has contributed to a number of international publications and other media worldwide. On October 2, 2018, Reza defended his doctoral dissertation in English Literature and Criticism at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) under the title “The Recurring Progress of English Political Thought in Shakespeare’s Histories,” with a concentration on political thought, history of ideas, philosophy of history, cultural studies and Shakespeare, and passed it with distinction.

Reza Parchizadeh has 7 posts and counting. See all posts by Reza Parchizadeh